A Name To Call Myself….Please!

what to call myself as a magician

I’m in a bit of a quandary. I’m having an identity crisis (OK, so “crisis” may be a tad overdramatic, but you get the idea). In short, I don’t know what to refer to myself as.

It used to be easy when I did just close up magic; I was a “close up magician”. Easy.

Now that I’m no longer just doing close up shows, especially after having done stand up comedy and bigger cabaret style shows, it’s not quite so easy to describe myself in a nice, pithy line.

“Magician” seems very ordinary and vague. “Comedy Magician” conjures images of weird and brightly coloured props, along with being “wacky” or “zany”. “Funny magician” makes me sound like I could be a potential threat, or am just plain weird.

A lot of magicians use prefixes such as “Elite”, “Premier”, “International”, “Quality” or “Professional”, but, to me at least, these don’t really say anything about the performer or the act. I’d really like something that sums up what I do, or the mood I create.

For me, magic is about having fun, interacting and having some back and forth banter with the audience….

…how about “The man with the bants?”….no.

Where was I? Yes, it’s about fun and interaction…about improvising situational humour that flows naturally from the audience, the room or the occasion etc… The truth is, at least half of what I do isn’t actually about magic. It’s about getting people to smile and have some fun…and you don’t need to do tricks to do that.

…”Interactive Magician”? No, that’s even worse…

So you can see my problem. How can you effectively sum up what you do…

….”Magical Entertainer…?”

…in a few short words?

I know people can spend years coming up with the perfect slogan or tagline, so I’ve probably got unrealistic expectations about getting this down by lunchtime, but it’s worth a shot.

If you’ve ever seen me perform, or want to make a suggestion, feel free. Yell slogans, buzzwords and ideas at me; the more the merrier. I would give a King’s ransom* for any ideas that I use.

“Mystery Magic Man of Mirth”?

I need help….

 

 

* Contrary to popular opinion, a “King’s Ransom” is not a large amount of money. The origins of the phrase, date back to 1705, where the King of Venezuela was captured by rebel troops, who demanded a “King’s ransom” in return for the his safe return. What the rebels actually demanded was a copy of the latest David Essex album and a small pack of Chewits.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Get in touch:

Email John Call John ×