The First Thing You Need to do to Eliminate Party Planning Stress

I’m not a fully qualified Doctor you understand, but, if metal springs and cogs burst out of your head, you should probably go to hospital. Or have a lie down or something.

One of the best self help books I’ve ever bought was The Success Principles by Jack Canfield. The man behind the bestselling “Chicken Soup for the Soul” series of books, compiled 64 principles together in one book (and it’s a big book) in a way that makes it very easy to read.

475 pages of principles could make for a dry book, but, thankfully, it’s laid out with short chapters and sections that allow you to dip in wherever you’d like and start reading. It’s not an academic book, filled with lots of technical, scientific data and tests to back up its ideas. Indeed, you’ll probably hear yourself thinking “well, isn’t this just common sense?” a lot of the time, but, as Voltaire said, “Common sense is not so common”.

It doesn’t help to be reminded. And this book is a great reminder.

The book has a kind of “greatest hits” feel about it, in that it doesn’t specialise in one area of self help, it covers many. It’s as if someone had condensed all the great ideas from all the other books and put it into one volume.

That’s not meant as a criticism, nor a compliment actually, just the feeling I get when reading the book.

Anyway, I did promise that these posts wouldn’t be a review or a summary of the featured books, just that I would see if I could find some useful information that may be helpful when planning your wedding or event.

And, in the Success Principles, there is.

In fact, it’s the very first principle:

“Take 100% responsibility for everything”.

You have to take ownership of everything you want to have, do or become in your life.

You’re not entitled to anything; you have to earn it.

Take ownership. Give up blaming, complaining and excuses.

If you want something, make the decision to achieve it and set about it.

This doesn’t mean that you have to actually do everything yourself. What it does mean is that, if you choose to delegate tasks, don’t delegate the responsibility.

If you passed the responsibility for the hen party for your wedding to your chief bridesmaid, and she fouls it up, it’s still YOUR responsibility. After all, you were the one that gave her the task.

If you’re booking a corporate event and book a cheap, unreliable entertainer who doesn’t show up, it’s YOUR responsibility, as you were the one who chose them.

You’d think that taking 100% responsibility for everything would cause you more stress, hassle and worry, but it actually doesn’t. It relieves it.

When you take the responsibility, you become more focused and careful about who you pass tasks too. You don’t just hand out jobs left, right and centre to clear them from your mental inbox. This kind of scattergun approach just leads to disaster, as your goal becomes ridding yourself of unwanted tasks, rather than completing them successfully.

When you take 100% responsibility, you rid yourself of a massive amount of negativity. You have no excuses, you don’t blame anyone and you can’t complain. You just focus on doing the best you can.

And that’s all you can ever do.

So, liberate yourself from stress and anxiety by taking 100% responsibility for everything you want to be, do and have in your life, whether that be planning your wedding, or saving up for a new Xbox One X 1TB (I have no idea what any of those letters mean).


If you’re looking for an easy to read, generic self help book, I think you’ll enjoy The Success Principles by Jack Canfield. I often find myself recommending it to friends who are just looking for an inspirational book, rather than an answer to a specific question in life.

Note: the links in this post are affiliate links, meaning that I could receive a small commission if you click them and buy stuff. It doesn’t add anything to your price, but I’d feel guilty if I didn’t mention it.

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